A Halloween Soundtrack

Illustration: SHALTMIRA

It’s the most wonderful time of the year, a time to celebrate all the horrible visions in your head and not get arrested. I loaded up a sexy version of this costume for myself to wear to the Big Halloween Party. There’s plenty of holes in it already but I’m going to make some new ones. I guess we’ll see what comes out of it! Bow wow wonderful.

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I’ve heard enough Halloween mixes and playlists to give me the hot heebie-jeebies, which is way less whimsical than it sounds. Gotta get my body washed and prepped for the Big Halloween Party. The standard for any good H trip is to make it transformative for the attendee. Let a jack-of-all-trades like myself jack up your pumpkinparty, let me shine a light right in there with my…what’s this? A jack’o’lantern? Hoo hoooo. I took too many pills. Trick that Halloween treat out properly and normal boundaries of space+time won’t even matter anymore. Non-Euclidean geometry up in the club, DJ on infinite decks with Wiley-voice skipping “HARD” but the instrumental is chiming bells and gurgles? Is this the remix? Shorty next to me is grinding and weeping and I can’t tell where her mouth ends. It doesn’t even matter anymore because my shit turned in to some tentacle shit.

I can’t help you decorate your party, but I can supply you with the sounds you need to make your peer group respect you, with dancing. So I made you a mix:

It’s no “Everyday is Halloween” or anything, but it captures the essence of Halloween as I see it: Sounds for nightfalls, shapes under sheets, real witches and elder young gods filled with strange samples, field recordings, TV personalities, and favorite tracks. Artists include: Black Rain, Frank Sinatra, Breached Hull, Codex Empire, The Bug, Scott Walker & Sunn O))), Cut Hands, Dead Boomer,  Gazelle Twin, Pain Station, Dolly Parton, Clay Rendering, Propergol, and Funeral Parlor. Sweet sounds for sundowns. Gorge your belly and swallow your gorge: this is Halloween.

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A week in the life: 168 hrs Kraftwerk, NYC part 2

Read part 1 here.

 

WEDNESDAY

 

Photo: Max Dax

 

Ruza ‘Kool Lady’ Blue, producer, promoter, and founder of legendary club The Roxy, NYC’s first hip-hop club

I originally came to New York in 1981 from London to run a fashion store for Malcolm McLaren and Vivienne Westwood called Worlds End 2 in Soho. At the time I had been living in the Chelsea Hotel and fashion and music for me were always intimately connected, something that both Malcom and Vivienne understood very well. In the eighties, the burgeoning hip-hop scene wasn’t really that organized, and there was no hip-hop scene in downtown Manhattan. But there were DJs, MCs, B-Boys, B-Girls, dancers, and graf artists scattered all over the place up in the Bronx, so I basically went up there and brought them all downtown, and organized them. They had no idea where this journey would take them, nor did I.

I had first been exposed to hip-hop through watching Afrika Bambaataa and The Rock Steady Crew open for Bow Wow Wow at The Ritz, which was a show Malcom had actually organized. That was when my mouth dropped and hip-hop replaced punk for me in terms of main musical interests. In the early days it was all so experimental, and it was never about making money or bling-bling, or shareholder meetings, but more about unity and fun and dancing to incredible music. My contribution was, I guess, combining all of these elements into the electronic dance club context, and it worked. It was mad. You could feel an overwhelming sense that things were shifting into a new era of explosive creative freedom and change in NYC. Mash-up culture was born and DIY was the name of the game. You could do anything and no one would judge you.

The hip-hop and downtown scenes mixed fantastically; like the perfect cocktail and a brilliant sense of humor. I had this gut feeling it would work and after a short spell promoting parties at Club Negril, which got closed down, I had the idea to move the scene and start the Roxy parties, which ended up being game-changing. I always wanted to open a massive dance club in NYC on the euro-electro music tip— people dancing to the sounds of Kraftwerk, Ultravox,and the like. But I wanted to do it with a twist. I was particularly inspired by the blitz-electro-new-romantic scene in London and what DJ Rusty Egan was doing, but I didn’t want it to be so exclusive.

I think the Roxy was the first racially diverse electronic dance club ever, and it became the blue- print for so many important clubs. We had everyone from punks like John Lydon, to serious couture fashionistas like Carolina Herrera, to Madonna, to twelve-year-old B- Boys, DJs like Bambaataa, to Andy Warhol, Keith Haring, Mick Jagger, Leigh Bowery, Debbie Harry, Julian Schnabel, and the ubiquitous Glenn O’Brien. And then there was all the people from the Bronx . . . All barriers came down and there were absolutely no age limits. We shunned Studio 54’s elitist policy, and we knew we were on the right track because the juxtaposition of these diverse sets of people was so mind blowing. At the time, hip-hop culture was all embracing: no one cared if you were a tranny, had blue hair or wore spandex or a Sex Pistols t-shirt. This was the party where white people first saw all four elements of hip-hop culture showcased in one place in downtown NYC and in a massive dance club environment.

There are so many stories to tell, I can’t think of them all . . . I remember booking Malcolm McLaren to perform his hit ‘Buffalo Gals’ at the club, and he went missing the night of his show. He had serious stage fright, but I managed to locate him in a bar somewhere in Midtown and convince him to come to the club and that things would be all right. It turned out great in the end, of course. Prior to that, I managed to convince Malcolm to give me a copy of The Great Rock ‘n’ Roll Swindle to show at the club. That was the first time the film was ever shown in America, and what a pivotal night that was; when hip-hop met punk face-to- face. The right chemistry was there so I ended up screening the film every other week for a laugh. I felt like a mad scientist mixing and mashing up cultures to create a new conversation.

Kraftwerk were very, very important to my club. Everyone danced to Kraftwerk—and I mean everyone. I made sure their songs were played every week, and it quickly became part of the soundtrack. I find it extremely difficult to rate their output, because virtually everything has been so influential and so high quality. But if I had to choose, I would say Radio-Activity, Trans- Europe Express, and Computer World are my absolute favorites. I’ve also had the chance to see them live a couple of times, most recently at the MoMA retrospective. All I could think is how timeless and relevant this band is, especially in today’s Apple computer culture. And I loved the idea of wearing the 3-D glasses. I attended Trans- Europe Expresstogether with Afrika Bambaataa, and it brought back a lot of good memories of the Roxy and ‘Planet Rock’. Of course, ‘Numbers’ and ‘Trans-Europe Ex- press’ were classic Roxy anthems. Musically, I am not sure you can overestimate Kraftwerk’s influence. Like hip-hop, Kraftwerk is everywhere and still miles ahead of their time. For me, Kraftwerk was the perfect mash-up band as far as representing the future goes. And they had a message. Even though their lyrics were minimal, they remain incredibly poignant, even today. ‘Radioactivity’ is perhaps the perfect example.

 

THURSDAY

 

Photo: Max Dax

 

Afrika Bambaataa, producer, DJ, and founding member of Soulsonic Force and founder of Zulu Nation

It’s always interesting for me to see a crowd dancing to music that’s ‘foreign’, especially if the lyrics are in a foreign language. Miriam Makeba, Manu Dibango, Salsa, Falco—you name it. That’s why when I first picked up a copy of the English version Trans-Europe Express, I made sure to pick up a German copy too. I love the crossing over. That’s what electro-funk was all about in the beginning. I actually listened to it for the first time on one of those little record players—the ones that have their own speaker. I liked it, but only when I put it on my big sound system was I really blown away. All I could think was, “I’m gonna jam this mother!”

The first time I played it was at the Bronx River Center and immediately people understood. I always had the most progressive hip-hop audience. Most of the other DJs waited to see what my audience was into before they played anything at their function. They knew: Bambaataa’s crazy and he’ll play anything, so I was like the one in the laboratory doing the experiments first, and at a special place. In the beginning, Bronx River Center had mostly black and Latino partygoers from the Bronx and north Manhattan. Then as things progressed and we started playing on different systems and downtown and all that, that’s when all the new wavers started coming and it became a whole mixed atmosphere from all over the city. But most, like, ‘famous’ people came to see us—Zulu Nation and Soulsonic Force—at the Roxy. That’s how the electro-funk spread. But it’s not exactly where it began.

To me, Kraftwerk always sounded European. Trans-Europe Express especially. But I understood the train and travel as a metaphor for transporting the sound through the whole universe, and so was their influence and power. Whenever I felt the band’s vibration all I could think of is that this is some other type of shit. This is the music for the future and for space travels— along with the funk of what was happening with James Brown and Sly Stone and George Clinton. Of course, I was listening to a lot of Yellow Magic Orchestra and Gary Numan, as well as Dick Hyman’s Moog sound, and music from John Carpenter’s Halloween. When you put all that together, then you get electro-funk, which is what we were doing. Freestyle and Miami bass— that’s where it all came from. That’s the true techno-pop.

With ‘Planet Rock’ I was hoping to stretch the hip-hop community’s musical spectrum on the one hand, and the new wavers’ on the other. It was about channelling the vibrations of the supreme force, of the universe, to maximum effect, even beyond earth to the extra terrestrials. Kraftwerk, James, Sly, and George played exactly that. But Kraftwerk brought the funk with machines and computers. They might not have thought they were doing funk, but they were doing funk. When you see older movies about space and the future, it’s filled with stuff like spaceships and rayguns. The newer ones like The Matrix or whatever have their own vision of what’s next. Kraftwerk does all that with music.

When I met Kraftwerk in a club in Paris in the eighties, there was mutual respect. We talked about doing something together, but that happens all the time. Unfortunately we never got to make that happen. But I did get to record in Conny Plank’s studio with Afrika Islam. It’s interesting to think about how Kraftwerk was reinterpreted in America, and then through a very different filter came back to Germany to influence all sorts of electronic and techno acts. The name WestBam, short for Westfalia Bambaataa, says it all.

I’m definitely glad I had the opportunity to catch them at the MoMA. Of course, I’d seen them play live before and I have all sorts of live recordings from back in the day, but this was a different thing. I really enjoyed it, but to be perfectly honest, it wasn’t the same as hearing them in a club.

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Trick or mix – Halloween roundup

Trick or mix - Halloween roundup October 31st? Must be Halloween then, and what Halloween would be complete without a chilling selection of spooky mixes and evil tracks from some of our favourite selectors. To save you the trouble of searching the internet for your dose of musical devilry we have put together a round up of some the best mixes and give-aways from Deadboy, Pilooski and more

1. LITTLEFOOT – Well Haunted. Also, well skankin’, well good and well free.
LITTLEFOOT : Well Haunted (WRND Halloween Special) FREE WAV 🙂 by Well Rounded Records

2. B3SCI – Halloween Pt3 mix tape. Beetlejuice, Ministry and Skrillex. Can you think anything more terrifying? Nope, us neither. Get the goods here.

3. Deadboy doing his best scary face for Bristol’s Crazylegs. On a similar tip to his mix from last halloween, expect lots more horror scores ala Goblin.

4. A more reserved take on the concept of a haunting mix. Pilooski weaves together a silky selection of odd ball disco with a spectral outlook. Grab the mix here.

5. Dope Halloween Fuck. Does what it says on the tin – Compilation from Crash Cymbals featuring unreleased music from The New Lines, Bone Quida Ida, Daniel Sex Jr. And Twin Peaks samples. Far out.
Dope Halloween Fuck by Crash Symbols

6. BASEDINTHERAIN666. Maudlin terror hip-hop. Not as bad as that makes it sound. KeyBoard Kid 206 brings the fright tonight. Grab a free track below.
BASEDINTHERAIN666 by Keyboard Kid 206

7. Last, but by no means least, what would Halloween be without some John Carpenter? Exactly, so here is Glass Candy’s take on the classic title score from Halloween.
GLASS CANDY / HALLOWEEN by JOHNNY JEWEL

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