We Love: Paula Temple’s <i>Deathvox</i> EP

We Love is an opportunity for EB writers to contemplate, rant, and rave about one of their current musical obsessions and the deeper issues they inspire. In this installment, Daniel Jones finds destructive energy in Paula Temple‘s Deathvox EP, out now on R&S.

During a recent chat with David Psutka (AKA Night Slugs regular Egyptrixx), we talked about the similarities between techno and black metal. He told me that both genres are often built around repetition and low-end bass, engineered to hypnotize and simultaneously propel the body into spasms—”concussion plus tranquility,” as he put it. Paula Temple’s Deathvox EP is  closer to the tribalist industrial techno of Cut Hands, but it attracts me in the same way as a lot of my favorite modern black metal groups, extending right own to the attached visuals.

The stark shots of forest, mountains, and bodies of water in the title track’s video resemble the aesthetics of Northern European metal fiends like the one-woman Danish band Myrkur. When I first saw the video, I was sitting on the floor, surrounded by incense and a picture of a dog with messed-up eyes, like a goats eyes. My friends and angry neighbors often refer to music with pounding percussion and otherworldly screams as “extremely Daniel’s shit,” and upon hearing “Deathvox,” I rose to my feet and started slamming myself into the wooden pillars in my living room, eager to reignite the rush of adrenaline and happiness that the song had poured into me. The video left me keyed-up, so I vented my energy by trying to chop and screw Sunn O))). Ten minutes into the project, I ran out of hard drive space.

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We Love: Klara Lewis’s <i>Msuic</i>

We Love is an opportunity for EB writers to contemplate, rant, and rave about one of their current musical obsessions and the deeper issues they inspire. 

I genuinely enjoy and appreciate Klara Lewis’s Msuic EP. Its moods range from badass to spaced-out to über late-night deepness, which reflects my emotional range, and in fact I’m so impressed by this release that I’m currently lingering Lewis’s Discogs page and queuing up some tracks from her recent LP on Editions Mego. (How did I miss that LP??? Can someone send me a DL???) But, alas, the conventions of premiere posting don’t seem to reflect my feelings toward this music, so I boiled it all down to an easily-digestible outline of virtually every track post I’ve ever written. I know, how subversive of me.

A lede that contextualizes the artist and the music they make:
“Lately, we’ve been really digging ambitiously experimental electronics, so it’s no surprise that Klara Lewis’s latest EP caught our attention.”

What the EP sounds like:
-shifting ambient sonics
-industrial-tinged, teeth-gritting drone
-clicking techno beats with ultra-deep techno vibe

Some information about the artist:
-this EP is called Msuic
-comes out on Peder Mannerfelt’s label on November 24

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We Love: Youth Code’s “A Place To Stand” EP

We Love is an opportunity for EB writers to contemplate, rant, and rave about one of their current musical obsessions and the deeper issues they inspire. In this installment, Daniel Jones reps the latest EP from LA industrialists Youth Code, out now on Dais.

Industrial music was in a really crummy place for a while. After decades of socially transgressive viciousness, the genre succumbed to toothless jock posturing, rotten with misogynistic lyrics masquerading as post-goth poetry and focused more on neon cyber-wardrobes than aural craftsmanship. Youth Code don’t roll that way. Their thrash-inducing new EP, A Place To Stand, builds on the driving EBM of their self-titled debut and cranks the dosage of scuzzed-out hardcore punk to a mind-melting degree.

From the opening blast of “Consuming Guilt,” the band pummels listeners with brutal beats and vocals that are half-spoken word, half-raw and rusted machine wails. The tracks are imbued with a strong socio-political edge and (surprisingly) a smart synthpop sensibility—provided you like your synthpop shrieked at high volume. Backed up by a selection of strong remixes (my favorite of which is Clipping.’s dubbed-over rap on “Wear The Wounds”), the experience feels far heftier than you’d expect from the average EP. For anyone seeking the best that industrial music has to offer in 2014, A Place To Stand is essential.

 

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